Britain will participate in Eurovision in Israel

BBC announces it will participate as planned, despite call by artists to boycott the event.

...
Read More

Russia to study Israeli data related to downed plane

MOSCOW (AP) — Russian President Vladimir Putin has accepted Israel's offer to share detailed information on the Israeli airstrike in ...
Read More

Middleton shooting: At least four people injured in Wisconsin office building shooting

Multiple people have been injured in a shooting at an office building in Wisconsin. Middleton police received reports of an ...
Read More

Trump Tells Hurricane Florence Survivor 'At Least You Got A Nice Boat Out Of The Deal'

Hurricane Florence has resulted in at least 37 deaths in three states, but
...
Read More

Florence Kills An Estimated 5,500 Pigs, 3.4 Million Chickens And Turkeys In North Carolina

As Florence battered the Carolinas this past week, dozens of heartwarming
...
Read More

Abbas plans NY meeting following closure of PLO office

Palestinian Authority leader calls on diplomats to join meeting in NY to confront 'radical shift' in US approach to Mideast ...
Read More

Sanctions biting but Iran not budging

FILE - In this Aug. 15, 2013, file photo, Iranian President Hasan Rouhani speaks during the debate on the proposed Cabinet at the parliament, in Tehran, Iran. New signs are emerging that international sanctions are taking a deepening toll on Iran's economy _ putting tens of billions of dollars in oil money out of the government's reach. Yet there is no indication the distress is achieving the West's ultimate goal of forcing the Islamic Republic to halt its nuclear program. (AP Photo/Ebrahim Noroozi)WASHINGTON (AP) New signs are emerging that international sanctions are taking a deepening toll on Iran's economy putting billions of dollars in oil money out of the government's reach. Yet there is no indication the distress is achieving the West's ultimate goal of forcing the Islamic Republic to halt its nuclear program.


On Syria, Obama says no rush toward costly interventions

President Barack ObamaBy Erika Solomon BEIRUT (Reuters) – President Barack Obama called the apparent gassing of hundreds of Syrian civilians a "big event of grave concern" but stressed on Friday he was in no rush to embroil Americans in a costly new war. As opponents of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad braved the frontlines around Damascus to smuggle out tissue samples from victims of Wednesday's mass poisoning, Obama brushed over an interviewer's reminder that he once called chemical weapons a "red line" that could trigger U.S. action. …