Analysis: Summit could be domestic win for S. Korean leader

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — The Korean leaders' surprisingly substantive summit announcement is a huge step toward a durable peace ...
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Tucker Carlson Blames Sexual Assault Victims For Not Going To The Police

Fox News host Tucker Carlson has been accused of victim blaming after he said
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Kim agrees to dismantle main nuke site if US takes steps too

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un agreed to permanently dismantle his main nuclear complex at if the U.S. takes corresponding ...
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3.4 million poultry, 5,500 hogs drowned in Florence flooding

About 3.4 million chickens and turkeys and 5,500 hogs have been killed in flooding from Florence as rising North Carolina ...
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Kavanaugh accuser's call for FBI inquiry before testimony is dismissed

Supreme court nominee Brett Kavanaugh has been accused of sexual assault by Christine Blasey Ford. Christine Blasey Ford, the woman ...
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Senate Democrats Support Christine Blasey Ford's Request for FBI Probe

A number of Senate Democrats came out Tuesday in support of Christine Blasey
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New talks on Iran nuclear deal open in Geneva

The building of the Permanent Mission of the European Union to the UN Office in Geneva is seen on January 9, 2014Iran and world powers met Thursday to discuss how to implement a landmark deal aimed at containing Tehran's nuclear drive, less than two weeks before the agreement is due to take effect. Iranian, EU and US negotiators gathered in Geneva for their highest-level talks since hammering out the groundbreaking November 24 deal. Russian President Vladimir Putin and his Iranian counterpart Hassan Rouhani also discussed the implementation of the accord in a phone conversation earlier in the day, according to the Kremlin. He also called on "certain countries to respect their own commitments (under the Geneva deal) and avoid new strictures that would shadow their goodwill."


Tunisia’s Jomaa, technocrat PM tasked with ending crisis

Tunisian premier-designate Mehdi Jomaa, arrives on December 25, 2013 at the Constituent Assembly in TunisTunisian premier-designate Mehdi Jomaa, tasked with forming an interim government of technocrats and overseeing fresh elections, is a political newcomer who faces mounting social grievances and the persistent threat of Islamist violence. He was picked on December 14 as the consensus candidate to head the caretaker administration and resolve Tunisia's festering political crisis, nearly three years after the uprising that toppled former strongman Zine El Abidine Ben Ali. The little-known former industry minister has since avoided making any public statements or appearances, with Tunisia's political climate dogged by mistrust between the ruling Islamist party Ennahda and the mainly secular opposition. Unemployment and regional inequality were driving factors behind the revolution that unseated Ben Ali, inspiring protests across the Middle East and North Africa that toppled leaders in Egypt, Libya and Yemen.