The blood transfusions that will save soldiers’ lives

IDF to replace current blood supply with whole blood, significantly increasing effectiveness of battlefield transfusions.

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Medical faculty approved for Ariel University

Council for Higher Education approves new medical faculty at Samaria university - the sixth medical faculty in Israel.

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Surrogacy bill excluding LGBT couples passes into law

Despite saying he will not support the surrogacy bill while it excludes same-sex couples, Netanyahu votes in favor of the ...
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U.S. asks court to detain alleged Russian agent pending trial

By Sarah N. Lynch WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Justice Department asked a federal court on Wednesday to detain alleged ...
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Forbidden by Rabbinate yet approved by Tzohar

Chief Rabbinate informs public: Artichoke forbidden to eat by Rabbinate served in restaurant holding Tzohar kosher certification.

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Did Birthright give in to terrorism?

Taglit-Birthright orders participants to stay away from south during tense period of arson and rocket attacks.

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Iraq’s Crisis: Can the Sunni Awakening Rise Again?

For nearly a week, media reports from Iraq were eerily similar to those half a decade ago: fierce clashes had erupted between Iraqi troops and al-Qaeda insurgents in Anbar province. A wide expanse of farmland and desert that extends from the western Baghdad suburbs to the Syrian border, Anbar was the scene of some of the most brutal fighting of the Iraq War, in which more than 1,300 American troops lost their lives along with nearly 10,000 Iraqis. The news that hit many American veterans the hardest was that fighters affiliated with al-Qaeda had taken control of Fallujah, Anbar’s second largest city, where the U.S. fought two large, bloody battles in the spring and fall of 2004. “At the moment, there is no presence of the Iraqi state in Fallujah,” a local journalist, who was not named for safety reasons, told the Washington Post. “The police and the army have abandoned the city, al-Qaeda has taken down all the Iraqi flags and burned them, and it has raised its own flag on all the buildings.”

Israel unveils 1,800 settler homes after Kerry visit

Palestinian children looking towards bungalows built by Israeli settlers on seized land near the West Bank city of Birzeit, on December 3, 2013Israel unveiled plans Friday for more than 1,800 new settler homes in a move the Palestinians said was aimed at forcing Washington to abandon its Middle East peace drive. The announcement triggered concerns in Washington and at the United Nations, and came just days after US Secretary of State John Kerry wrapped up his latest visit to the region as part of tireless efforts to coax Israel and the Palestinians towards an elusive peace deal. The settlement move was widely believed to be an Israeli response to the release 10 days ago of a third batch of veteran Palestinian prisoners in accordance with commitments made to Washington last year. Just days before the 26 prisoners were freed, an Israeli official warned that the government would push ahead with plans for new settler homes as it has done twice previously in a bid to appease hardliners in the right-wing coalition of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.