The blood transfusions that will save soldiers’ lives

IDF to replace current blood supply with whole blood, significantly increasing effectiveness of battlefield transfusions.

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Medical faculty approved for Ariel University

Council for Higher Education approves new medical faculty at Samaria university - the sixth medical faculty in Israel.

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Surrogacy bill excluding LGBT couples passes into law

Despite saying he will not support the surrogacy bill while it excludes same-sex couples, Netanyahu votes in favor of the ...
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U.S. asks court to detain alleged Russian agent pending trial

By Sarah N. Lynch WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Justice Department asked a federal court on Wednesday to detain alleged ...
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Forbidden by Rabbinate yet approved by Tzohar

Chief Rabbinate informs public: Artichoke forbidden to eat by Rabbinate served in restaurant holding Tzohar kosher certification.

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Did Birthright give in to terrorism?

Taglit-Birthright orders participants to stay away from south during tense period of arson and rocket attacks.

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US set to unfreeze aid to Egypt

Egyptian men hold a poster with a portrait of late president Gamal Abdel Nasser and Egypt's Defence Minister General Abdel Fattah al-Sisi outside a polling station during the vote on a new constitution on January 14, 2014 in Giza, CairoCongress is prepared to allow US President Barack Obama to restore $1.5 billion in aid to Egypt, which is on a political knife edge as the military-backed government bids to consolidate its rule. A clause inserted deep into a broad federal spending bill, which is expected to pass as early as Friday, authorizes Washington to send $975 million to the Egyptian government. This could be activated provided the US administration certifies that Egypt "has held a constitutional referendum, and is taking steps to support a democratic transition in Egypt." An additional $576 million in aid would flow if and when Egypt holds parliamentary and presidential elections.


Army chief Sisi in focus as Egyptians vote on constitution

By Tom Perry and Asma Alsharif CAIRO (Reuters) – Egyptians voted on Tuesday for the first time since the military deposed president Mohamed Mursi on a draft constitution that may set the stage for a presidential bid by army chief General Abdel Fattah al-Sisi. At least seven people were killed in confrontations between Muslim Brotherhood supporters and police, official sources said, highlighting the tensions in the country. A small bomb went off in Cairo, injuring no one. The Brotherhood, still backing Mursi who is now in jail, has called for a boycott and protests over the draft, which deletes Islamic language written into the basic law approved a year ago when he was still in office.