Surrogacy bill excluding LGBT couples passes into law

Despite saying he will not support the surrogacy bill while it excludes same-sex couples, Netanyahu votes in favor of the ...
Read More

U.S. asks court to detain alleged Russian agent pending trial

By Sarah N. Lynch WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Justice Department asked a federal court on Wednesday to detain alleged ...
Read More

Forbidden by Rabbinate yet approved by Tzohar

Chief Rabbinate informs public: Artichoke forbidden to eat by Rabbinate served in restaurant holding Tzohar kosher certification.

...
Read More

Did Birthright give in to terrorism?

Taglit-Birthright orders participants to stay away from south during tense period of arson and rocket attacks.

...
Read More

Former White House Stenographer Speaks Out: 'Trump Was Lying To The American People'

A former White House stenographer said Wednesday that she resigned because
...
Read More

Barkat transfers NIS 700,000 to leftist foundation

Jerusalem municipality transfers NIS 700,000 to association that finances, among other things, 'Pride Parades' and Women of the Wall.

...
Read More

Jerusalem panel meets amid Israel-EU settlement row

Mahmud Abbas (L) and the Moroccan King Mohammed VI (2nd R) attend the al-Quds (meaning Jerusalem) Committee Meeting in Support of Middle East Peace Process on January 17, 2014 at the royal palace in MarrakeshMarrakech (Morocco) (AFP) – Palestinian president Mahmud Abbas warned on Friday against Israel using peace talks as a "cover" to expand settlements in the occupied West Bank. Abbas was speaking in Morocco at a meeting of the Al-Quds (Jerusalem) Committee amid heightened concern by Arab and Western nations over new Israeli settlements in the West Bank. The US-brokered peace talks must "not serve as a cover for the expansion of Israeli settlements in the occupied Palestinian territories," said Abbas.


Exclusive: Russia steps up military lifeline to Syria’s Assad – sources

Forces loyal to President al-Assad walk with weapons in Aleppo town of NaqarenBy Jonathan Saul LONDON (Reuters) – In recent weeks Russia has stepped up supplies of military gear to Syria, including armored vehicles, drones and guided bombs, boosting President Bashar al-Assad just as rebel infighting has weakened the insurgency against him, sources with knowledge of the deliveries say. Moscow, which is trying to raise its diplomatic and economic influence in the Middle East, has been a major provider of conventional weapons to Syria, giving Assad crucial support during the three-year civil war and blocking wider Western attempts to punish him with sanctions for the use of force against civilians. Syria has even said some countries formally opposed to Assad have begun discussing security cooperation with his government. Several sources told Reuters that Assad's forces had since December received deliveries of weaponry and other military supplies, including unmanned spy drones known as UAVs, which have been arranged by Russia either directly or via proxies.


Kerry insists no place for Assad in Syria’s future

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry insisted on Friday that President Bashar al-Assad has no place in Syria’s future and he said the United States had options to step up pressure on him. Kerry will lead a U.S. delegation to Switzerland next week for peace talks between the Syrian government and rebels aimed at ending the country’s civil war. Syrian opposition groups are meeting in Istanbul to vote on whether to attend the U.N.-backed talks in Montreux on January 22. “I believe as we begin to … get into this process, that it will become clear there is no political solution whatsoever if Assad is not discussing a transition and if he thinks he is going to be part of that future.

IAEA asks member states to pay extra cost of Iran nuclear deal

An Iranian operator monitors the nuclear power plant unit in BushehrBy Fredrik Dahl VIENNA (Reuters) – The U.N. atomic watchdog said on Friday it needed extra money from member states to fund the 6 million euro ($8.2 million) cost of verifying a landmark nuclear agreement between Iran and six world powers. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) will play a pivotal role in checking that Iran lives up to its part of the interim deal by curbing its disputed uranium enrichment activity in exchange for some easing of international sanctions that are severely damaging its oil-dependent economy. Israel, the United States and other western governments have long suspected Iran of using its nuclear energy program as a cover to develop atomic weapons. Tehran denies this, saying it needs nuclear power to generate electricity.