The blood transfusions that will save soldiers’ lives

IDF to replace current blood supply with whole blood, significantly increasing effectiveness of battlefield transfusions.

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Medical faculty approved for Ariel University

Council for Higher Education approves new medical faculty at Samaria university - the sixth medical faculty in Israel.

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Surrogacy bill excluding LGBT couples passes into law

Despite saying he will not support the surrogacy bill while it excludes same-sex couples, Netanyahu votes in favor of the ...
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U.S. asks court to detain alleged Russian agent pending trial

By Sarah N. Lynch WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Justice Department asked a federal court on Wednesday to detain alleged ...
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Forbidden by Rabbinate yet approved by Tzohar

Chief Rabbinate informs public: Artichoke forbidden to eat by Rabbinate served in restaurant holding Tzohar kosher certification.

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Did Birthright give in to terrorism?

Taglit-Birthright orders participants to stay away from south during tense period of arson and rocket attacks.

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U.S. accuses Syria of stalling on chemical arms handover

One of two cargo ships intended to take part in a Danish-Norwegian mission to transport chemical agents out of Syria docks in LimassolBy Lesley Wroughton and Matt Spetalnick WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The United States on Thursday accused Syria of dragging its feet on giving up its chemical arms, putting at risk a deal to remove such weapons of mass destruction from the country as it splits apart in a chaotic civil war. President Barack Obama this week touted the chemical weapons agreement as one of the few U.S. diplomatic achievements on Syria, but the State Department said just 4 percent of Syria's deadliest chemical agents has been shipped out of the country for destruction at sea.


Rights groups condemn Egypt over Jazeera crew trial

An employee of Al-Jazeera talks on the phone at the pan-Arab television channel's bureau in Cairo on January 30, 2011Global rights groups have strongly condemned Egypt's decision to try journalists working for Qatari-owned Al-Jazeera television, which Cairo accuses of backing the Muslim Brotherhood ousted from power by the military in July. Doha-based Al-Jazeera, which has angered the new authorities for its coverage of a deadly crackdown on the Brotherhood and supporters of ousted Islamist president Mohamed Morsi, says the charges are "silly and not based on any reality". Prosecutors say they have referred to trial 20 of the network's journalists, accusing them of portraying Egypt as being in a state of "civil war" and "airing false news".