The blood transfusions that will save soldiers’ lives

IDF to replace current blood supply with whole blood, significantly increasing effectiveness of battlefield transfusions.

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Medical faculty approved for Ariel University

Council for Higher Education approves new medical faculty at Samaria university - the sixth medical faculty in Israel.

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Surrogacy bill excluding LGBT couples passes into law

Despite saying he will not support the surrogacy bill while it excludes same-sex couples, Netanyahu votes in favor of the ...
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U.S. asks court to detain alleged Russian agent pending trial

By Sarah N. Lynch WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Justice Department asked a federal court on Wednesday to detain alleged ...
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After Trump's defense of Putin, sighs of resignation — but nobody's resigning (yet)

After President Trump’s performance in Helsinki, there have been calls for members of his Cabinet to resign. So far, no ...
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Forbidden by Rabbinate yet approved by Tzohar

Chief Rabbinate informs public: Artichoke forbidden to eat by Rabbinate served in restaurant holding Tzohar kosher certification.

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Iraq needs more than new government to address woes

New members of the Iraqi government attend a swearing-in ceremony in Baghdad on September 8, 2014Iraq's new cabinet lineup is not a major change and much more is needed to address grievances that contributed to the rise of brutal jihadists who seized swathes of the country, experts say. Having the support of Iraq's various religious and ethnic communities, especially members of its alienated Sunni Arab minority, is essential to the government's fight to regain ground lost to a sweeping offensive led by the Islamic State (IS) jihadist group. The proportion of posts given to members of the Shiite majority and the Sunni Arab and Kurdish minorities is largely the same as the previous government, and almost a third of the new ministers and deputy premiers held such posts before. "In terms of the sectarian division of the government, it's actually, if you're going to take it strictly by numbers, less inclusive," said Fanar Haddad, a research fellow at the Middle East Institute of the National University of Singapore.


Iran says IAEA nuclear inquiry not stalled, will address concerns

Iran's ambassador to the IAEA Najafi attends a news conference in ViennaBy Fredrik Dahl VIENNA (Reuters) – Iran said on Tuesday it would still address concerns about its nuclear program, even though it missed a deadline last month for providing information about its suspected atomic bomb research. Iran's envoy to the International Atomic Energy Agency suggested his country had not fully implemented five nuclear transparency measures by Aug. 25, as agreed with the IAEA, in part because of the "complexity" of the issues involved. Iranian and IAEA officials would meet soon again, perhaps by the end of September, Ambassador Reza Najafi told reporters. Western diplomats have often accused Iran of stonewalling the IAEA, but Najafi said: "There is no deadlock.