German court says Kuwait Airways can bar Israeli passengers

German appeals court rules that it cannot prevent Kuwait Airways from banning Israeli passengers, though it says policy is discrimination.

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Woman attacked during ultra-Orthodox demonstration

27 year old says she underwent a 'lynch' after being caught in a Haredi protest near Bnei Brak last week, ...
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Princess Anne Won't Shake Hands For A Very Royal Reason

While Meghan Markle and Prince Harry dish out hugs during royal walkabouts,
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High speed Jerusalem-Tel Aviv rail opens to the public

Civilian passengers take first trip on 100 MPH train connecting capital with Ben Gurion Airport.

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Trump rejects any meeting with Iran's Rouhani at U.N. gathering

Both countries' presidents were due to attend the annual United Nations General Assembly in New York. Trump is scheduled to ...
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Cabinet: IDF to continue operating against Iran in Syria

Security Cabinet says Israel shares in sorrow with Russia over planed downed by Syria, vows to continue to act to ...
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Iraq needs more than new government to address woes

New members of the Iraqi government attend a swearing-in ceremony in Baghdad on September 8, 2014Iraq's new cabinet lineup is not a major change and much more is needed to address grievances that contributed to the rise of brutal jihadists who seized swathes of the country, experts say. Having the support of Iraq's various religious and ethnic communities, especially members of its alienated Sunni Arab minority, is essential to the government's fight to regain ground lost to a sweeping offensive led by the Islamic State (IS) jihadist group. The proportion of posts given to members of the Shiite majority and the Sunni Arab and Kurdish minorities is largely the same as the previous government, and almost a third of the new ministers and deputy premiers held such posts before. "In terms of the sectarian division of the government, it's actually, if you're going to take it strictly by numbers, less inclusive," said Fanar Haddad, a research fellow at the Middle East Institute of the National University of Singapore.


Iran says IAEA nuclear inquiry not stalled, will address concerns

Iran's ambassador to the IAEA Najafi attends a news conference in ViennaBy Fredrik Dahl VIENNA (Reuters) – Iran said on Tuesday it would still address concerns about its nuclear program, even though it missed a deadline last month for providing information about its suspected atomic bomb research. Iran's envoy to the International Atomic Energy Agency suggested his country had not fully implemented five nuclear transparency measures by Aug. 25, as agreed with the IAEA, in part because of the "complexity" of the issues involved. Iranian and IAEA officials would meet soon again, perhaps by the end of September, Ambassador Reza Najafi told reporters. Western diplomats have often accused Iran of stonewalling the IAEA, but Najafi said: "There is no deadlock.