Rouhani: We’ll adhere to nuclear deal

Iranian President says his country will adhere to commitments under the 2015 nuclear deal: Haggling with it is ridiculous.

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Israel approves new treatment plan for polluted Yarkon River

The Yarkon is the largest river in Israel that flows into the Mediterranean; a rehab plan designed by the Water ...
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Hotovely to hold urgent discussion over Polish PM’s remarks

Deputy Foreign Minister will hold urgent discussion after Polish PM says Holocaust included "Jewish perpetrators".

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Israeli crime ‘princes’ inherit their fathers’ mantles, and the police’s scrutiny

The sons of a few crime bosses stepped into the vacuum left by their fathers’ incarceration, becoming new targets for ...
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Iran to protest ban of wrestler who boycotted Israeli

Iran’s wrestling federation to protest decision to ban one of its wrestlers for deliberately throwing a match to avoid fighting ...
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‘Now is the time to act against Iran’

National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster warns Iran is developing proxy armies in Lebanon, Syria, Yemen and Iraq.

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Countries wrestle with how to de-radicalise returning jihadists

An image grab uploaded on June 19, 2014 by Al-Hayat Media Centre shows Abu Muthanna al-Yemeni (C), believed to be Nasser Muthana, a 20-year-old man from Cardiff, Wales, speaking from an undisclosed locationCountries around the globe are experimenting with de-radicalisation programmes to deal with the threat of jihadists returning from the wars of the Middle East, but experts remain sceptical about their prospects. With thousands of mostly young Muslim men flooding into Syria and Iraq to take part in the jihad, governments across the world are struggling with how best to deal with those who come home battle-hardened and indoctrinated. Other countries – from Indonesia to India to Britain – have set up similar de-radicalisation programmes in recent years, hoping a soft approach will yield better long-term results in tackling violent extremism. "Let's be clear, for the moment de-radicalisation does not work," a senior French counterterrorism official told AFP on condition of anonymity.