The blood transfusions that will save soldiers’ lives

IDF to replace current blood supply with whole blood, significantly increasing effectiveness of battlefield transfusions.

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Medical faculty approved for Ariel University

Council for Higher Education approves new medical faculty at Samaria university - the sixth medical faculty in Israel.

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Surrogacy bill excluding LGBT couples passes into law

Despite saying he will not support the surrogacy bill while it excludes same-sex couples, Netanyahu votes in favor of the ...
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U.S. asks court to detain alleged Russian agent pending trial

By Sarah N. Lynch WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Justice Department asked a federal court on Wednesday to detain alleged ...
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After Trump's defense of Putin, sighs of resignation — but nobody's resigning (yet)

After President Trump’s performance in Helsinki, there have been calls for members of his Cabinet to resign. So far, no ...
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Forbidden by Rabbinate yet approved by Tzohar

Chief Rabbinate informs public: Artichoke forbidden to eat by Rabbinate served in restaurant holding Tzohar kosher certification.

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Red Cross ‘lost moral compass’ in war but says drew lessons

By Stephanie Nebehay GENEVA (Reuters) – The Red Cross “lost its moral compass” during World War Two, turning a blind eye to atrocities committed by the Nazis, but is speaking out more now about conflicts including Syria, its president said on Tuesday. Peter Maurer said the International Committee of the Red Cross had not recognized Nazi Germany for what it was and failed to protect civilians and especially Jews from persecution and murder. “It failed as a humanitarian organization because it had lost its moral compass,” Maurer said in a speech. This is more important today than ever because of what we see through the Middle East and Africa and even right here in Europe,” World Jewish Congress President Ronald Lauder said.

Dozens dead in Yemen as Iran, Saudi step up war of words

A Yemeni woman walks with her childr near the residence of the military commander of Shiite-Huthi group, Abdullah Yahya al-Hakim, after an air strike destroyed his property in the Yemeni capital, Sanaa, on April 28, 2015Fighting between Shiite rebels and loyalists killed dozens of people across Yemen Tuesday as Iran accused Saudi Arabia of using Cold War-era tactics by airdropping leaflets warning of "Persian expansion". They destroyed the rebel-held Sanaa airport runway after an Iranian plane "defied" a blockade on Yemeni airspace and its pilot dismissed calls to land at a Saudi airport to be searched, coalition spokesman Brigadier General Ahmed al-Assiri told Al-Arabiya news channel. The conflict has exposed deteriorating relations between the Middle East's foremost powers, Saudi Arabia and Iran, which are increasingly seen as vying for supremacy in the region beset by bloody turmoil. On Tuesday, at least 70 people were killed in fighting between the Iran-backed rebels and pro-government forces in several parts of Yemen, sources said.


EU to set up new counter-terrorism centre

European Commission First Vice-President Frans Timmermans comments during an interview in Brussels, April 27, 2015, that the centre will try to see whether the member states can learn to work with each other on the basis of trustThe EU on Tuesday announced plans for an intelligence sharing centre to help its 28 member states ward off deadly jihadist attacks, but with limited powers that will not amount to the equivalent of a European FBI. Unveiling the bloc's security priorities for the next five years, European Commission First Vice President Frans Timmermans told AFP that the counter-terrorism centre would be set up within Europol, the continent's policing agency based in The Hague. "We're creating the centre to see whether the member states can come together more often and learn to work with each other on the basis of trust," Timmermans said in an interview in his Brussels office before travelling to the French city of Strasbourg to brief the European Parliament on the security plan. With jihadists launching deadly attacks in the last 12 months in Brussels, Copenhagen and Paris, the European Commission — the bloc's executive arm — is trying to promote counter-terrorism cooperation among member states.


Gulf states must allow Nepali workers to return after quake: trade union

By Nita Bhalla NEW DELHI (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – Hundreds of thousands of Nepali migrants working in Gulf States must be allowed to return home after a massive earthquake devastated their impoverished nation, a trade union group said on Tuesday. The International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC), which has 176 million members globally, said it had written to the Qatar, Saudi Arabia and United Arab Emirates governments to ask them to suspend a sponsorship system which prevents the free movement of workers. The system has long been criticized by human rights groups and trade unions who have likened it to a form of modern day slavery, where employers take workers’ passports and use possession to keep them there or extort a large fee before allowing them to leave. “We call upon the Gulf States, which rely so heavily on cheap and exploited labor from Nepal, to show compassion and immediately suspend the kafala restrictions which are stopping Nepalese people returning home for bereavement and to help reconstruct the country,” said ITUC General Secretary Sharan Burrow in a statement.