Why the United States Needs North Korea to Stay Nuclear

A nuclear North Korea is not a threat, but an ideal stabilizer. Many are hopeful that the June 12 summit ...
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Abbas, Haniyeh congratulate Erdogan

PA chairman and Hamas leader congratulate Turkish President on his reelection.

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Roseanne Barr in interview: 'I made myself a hate magnet'

In an emotional interview, Roseanne Barr said she definitely feels remorse for the racist tweet that prompted ABC to cancel ...
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Turkey's Erdogan claims election victory, opposition wary

By Ece Toksabay and Tuvan Gumrukcu ANKARA (Reuters) - Tayyip Erdogan and his ruling AK Party claimed victory in Turkey's ...
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IAF gets new ‘Adir’ aircraft

Three additional F-35I aircraft arrive at the Nevatim Airbase and will soon begin taking part in operational activity.

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The Latest: Group: 'No magic bullet' to family reunification

MCALLEN, Texas (AP) — The Latest on the separation of immigrant children from their parents (all times local):
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Washington, Gulf states working on new security pact: Kerry

US Secretary of State John Kerry speaks at a joint news conference at the Chief of Mission Residence in Paris on May 8, 2015, following a meeting with the foreign ministers of the Gulf Cooperation CouncilUS Secretary of State John Kerry said Friday Washington and Gulf nations were hammering out a new set of security initiatives in the Middle East to be further discussed at a summit next week. Kerry met in Paris with his counterparts from Qatar, Kuwait, Bahrain, Oman, the United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia to lay the groundwork for a meeting of their leaders with President Barack Obama on May 13. Washington is keen to allay Gulf fears that the US is increasingly disengaging from a region riven by conflict, and that Iran could still develop a nuclear bomb under a international accord currently being finalised.


U.N. agency accuses Hungary government moves “vilifying” refugees

A U.N. agency expressed “deep concern” on Friday over what it said was a growing tendency by Hungary to denigrate refugees fleeing war, adding its voice to criticism of the government’s anti-immigration stance. Prime Minister Viktor Orban, who wants legislation to speed up the deportation of illegal migrants, raised eyebrows last month when he announced plans for a nationwide questionnaire in May to see if Hungarians thought immigrants spread terrorism. Montserrat Feixas Vihe, the regional representative in central Europe for the U.N. refugee agency UNHCR, said Orban’s government was targeting the very people who needed help. “We are deeply concerned by the way the government increasingly vilifies people who have fled from war zones like Syria, Afghanistan and Iraq and who desperately need safety and protection in Hungary,” she said.