IDF: No criminal investigation in 2014 battle

IDF Military Advocate General releases findings on use of Hannibal Protocol to rescue Hadar Goldin when Hamas violated a ceasefire.

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Clarification call for IDF lecturer who criticized Liberman

Chief Education Officer summons 'secular yeshiva' founder and IDF lecturer after he wrote of DM, 'man closest to fascist characteristics.'

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Israel Eases Restrictions on Gaza Imports After Days of Relative Calm

Moving to stabilize a shaky cease-fire with the Hamas-governed enclave, the Israelis lifted the five-week ban on all goods other ...
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Court recommends the expulsion of Eritrean asylum seekers

Jerusalem's court of appeals recommends the expulsion of Eritreans lacking refugee status; 'Israeli citizens living near infiltrators are suffering, and ...
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Turkey slaps retaliatory tariff hikes on key US products

Turkey hiked Wednesday tariffs on imports of several key US products in retaliation for American sanctions against Ankara, as a ...
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The Latest: Minister: Genoa bridge operators should resign

GENOA, Italy (AP) — The Latest developments following the deadly collapse of a highway bridge in Italy (all times local):
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IT chief at Bangladesh Coca-Cola unit arrested as Islamic State suspect

By Ruma Paul and Serajul Quadir DHAKA (Reuters) – An IT manager at a subsidiary of Coca-Cola Co was one of two men arrested in Bangladesh on suspicion of planning to fight for Islamic State in Syria, police and company sources said on Monday. The pair were detained during a raid in the capital Dhaka on Sunday night, said Sheikh Nazmul Alam, a senior official of the police detective branch. One man, Aminul Islam, was the information technology head of a multinational company, and worked as a regional coordinator for Islamic State, while the other, Sakib Bin Kamal, was a teacher at a school in Dhaka, he added.

Iran will need to spend most of any post-sanctions windfall at home

By Lesley Wroughton and Sam Wilkin WASHINGTON/DUBAI (Reuters) – Iranians will demand their government spend a windfall from the lifting of economic sanctions on improving the quality of life at home, limiting the degree to which a future nuclear deal could fund Tehran’s allies on Middle East battlefields. Since 2012, Iran has given support worth billions of dollars to regional allies, funding and arming mainly fellow Shi’ite Muslims in conflicts that have taken on a sectarian dimension. Within months of financial sanctions being lifted, Iran will be able to collect debts from overseas banks that may exceed $100 billion, mostly from oil importers whose payments have been blocked, diplomats and analysts said.

U.N. urges Lebanon to pick president, end political vacuum

A United Nations envoy urged Lebanon’s feuding political leaders to pick a new president, warning on Monday that the country’s year-long power vacuum had undermined its ability to deal with the impact of the Syrian crisis and a host of other problems. Lebanese politics has long been dogged by sectarian divisions and personal rivalries but the war next door has exacerbated divisions even further. “I urge Lebanon’s leaders … to put national interests above partisan politics for the sake of Lebanon’s stability, and to show the flexibility and sense of urgency needed to resolve this issue,” U.N. Special Coordinator for Lebanon Sigrid Kaag said in a statement marking one year without a president.

Islamic State faces battle in Iraq, U.S. reassures Abadi

Members of the Iraqi army and Shi'ite fighters launch a mortar toward Islamic State militants outskirt the city of FallujaBAGHDAD/WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Islamic State poured more fighters into Ramadi as security forces and Shi'ite paramilitaries prepared to try to retake the Iraqi city, while Washington scrambled on Monday to reassure Baghdad after a U.S. official's sharp criticism of Iraqi forces. U.S. Vice President Joe Biden spoke to Iraqi Prime Minister Haidar al-Abadi after Defense Secretary Ash Carter questioned Iraqi troops' will to fight when Ramadi fell.