‘We should say ‘Shehecheyanu’

After 14 years of fighting in Israeli courts, property in Beit Hanina seized by Arabs is returned to Jews.

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IDF calls for Israeli political pressure on Gaza civilians in last-ditch effort to avoid war

Senior officers understand that the government is under pressure over its failure to stop incendiary kites and other attacks from ...
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Twitter Users Aren't Buying Trump's Excuse About Defending Russia

President Donald Trump's attempt at damage control isn't going over so well.
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Trump: I accept intelligence on Russian meddling

Trump walks back remarks at press conference with Putin about Russian interference in 2016 election.

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Yemen war: President Hadi has ‘no regrets’ over Saudi-led strikes

Abdrabbuh Mansour Hadi says he has no regrets about the Saudi-led military operation in Yemen ...
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Rabbi who fought against the Alliance dies at 91

Rabbi Moshe Lasry, native of Casablanca, founded Otzar Hatorah institutions in Morocco, Tunisia, Algeria, Iran to fight 'Alliance' schools.

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After Netanyahu talks, Kerry says Israeli-Palestinian strife may ease

Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu meets with U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry in BerlinBy Arshad Mohammed BERLIN (Reuters) – U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry on Thursday voiced cautious hope there may be a way to defuse Israeli-Palestinian violence that has killed nearly 60 people this month. Speaking to reporters after about four hours of talks with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, Kerry said he thought there were steps that could reduce the violence and said they needed to be discussed with Jordanian and Palestinian officials. “I would characterize that conversation as one that gave me a cautious measure of optimism that there may be … a way to defuse the situation and begin to find a way forward,” Kerry told reporters after he met Netanyahu at a Berlin hotel.

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Iraq set for cholera vaccine campaign amid fear of international spread: WHO

Iraqi medical staff work in a vehicle during a vaccination campaign against cholera at a makeshift camp housing displaced Iraqis who fled the violence in the Iraqi city of Ramadi, on the southern outskirts of Baghdad, on September 21, 2015Iraq plans to hold a mass vaccination campaign to halt a cholera outbreak that has infected more than 1,800 people amid fears it could spread among refugees in the region and beyond, the World Health Organization said Thursday. “We are going to start a vaccination campaign to try to prevent a further spread of the disease,” Dominique Legros, head of WHO’s cholera unit, told reporters. Iraq has confirmed 1,811 cases of the acute diarrhoeal disease since early September across 15 of the country’s 18 governorates, including most recently in the northern autonomous Kurdish region.

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Canada mourns terror attack dead, one year on

This October 22, 2014 photo shows police at the scene of a shooting at the National War Memorial in Ottawa, CanadaCanadians gathered Thursday at the national war memorial in solemn remembrance of an honor guard shot dead a year ago by an Islamist gunman who went on to storm parliament, and another soldier killed in rural Quebec. Prime Minister Stephen Harper was joined by prime minister-elect Justin Trudeau in laying a wreath in the latter’s first official public appearance since Monday’s legislative elections swept his Liberals into power. “We will not allow threats to shape us, nor bow to those who mean to undermine our values and way of life,” Trudeau said in a statement.

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U.S commando killed in raid to free hostages of ISIS in Iraq

By Phil Stewart and Isabel Coles WASHINGTON/ERBIL, Iraq (Reuters) – One member of a U.S. special operations force was killed during an overnight mission to rescue hostages held by Islamic State militants in northern Iraq, the first American to die in ground combat with the militant group, U.S. officials said on Thursday. Sixty-nine hostages were rescued in the action, which targeted an Islamic State prison around 7 kilometers north of the town of Hawija, according to the security council of the Kurdistan region, whose counterterrorism forces took part. Pentagon press secretary Peter Cook said at a news briefing the operation did not mark a change in U.S. tactics in the war on Islamic State militants, who pose the biggest security threat to Iraq since the fall of Saddam Hussein in 2003.

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