Syrian army deserters on why they had to escape the civil war

Seif and Ghadir both deserted the "slavery" of the Syrian Army and fled the country ...
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Forecast shows Israel’s heading for another dry winter

The Sea of Galilee has reached its lowest level in nine years ...
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Dwayne 'The Rock' Johnson and Girlfriend Lauren Hashian Are Expecting a Baby Girl!

Dwayne Johnson is going to be a dad again — and it’s another girl
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Watch: Fighting online BDS in wake of Jerusalem declaration

Act.il, a joint venture between IDC Herzliya and the IAC, seeks to present a different narrative on Israel.

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Muslim tomb found during Jerusalem roadwork deemed ‘not ancient,’ will be paved over

Tomb said to contain at least six skulls, large number of bones not protected by law that guards antiquities dating ...
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Ultra-Orthodox protesters prevent Israeli city from removing modesty signs, despite court order

Signs urge women to dress modestly, keep off of sidewalks where men congregate ■ Beit Shemesh says removals suspended 'due ...
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Campaigning wraps up for critical Turkey vote

Supporters listen to Turkish Prime Minister and Justice and Development (AK) party leader during an election campaign rally in Ankara on October 31, 2015Opinion polls are predicting a replay Sunday of the shock June election which stripped the Justice and Development Party (AKP) of its majority after 13 years of single-party rule, leaving the country without a government after coalition talks failed. Turkey goes into the election more polarised than ever on ethnic and sectarian lines, and deeply on edge after the Ankara bombings blamed on Islamic State jihadists that killed 102 people, the worst in the country’s modern history. The AKP of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is tipped to win between 40 and 43 percent of the vote, paving the way either for a shaky coalition that many analysts say will not last long — or yet another election.

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Ex-U.N. refugee agency chief urges Japan to do more to help

Sadako Ogata, former U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees, speaks during an interview in TokyoBy Linda Sieg and Ami Miyazaki TOKYO (Reuters) – Japan, which accepted less than a dozen asylum seekers last year, should show more leadership on refugees and craft an immigration policy given its need for foreign workers, a former U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees said on Thursday. Sadako Ogata, 88, whose great-grandfather, then-premier Tsuyoshi Inukai, was assassinated by radical naval officers in 1932, also said that while Japan’s military had a global role to play, it should not be one that involved fighting overseas. Japan announced last month it would provide some $1.6 billion to assist Syrians and Iraqis displaced by conflict and for building peace across the Middle East and Africa.

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Special forces in Syria don't mean USA entering civil war: Kerry

By Matt Spetalnick BISHKEK (Reuters) – A decision by U.S. President Barack Obama to send special forces to Syria is strictly focused on fighting Islamic State insurgents and does not signify the United States is entering the civil war there, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said. “President Obama has made a very strong and forceful and simple decision entirely in keeping with his originally stated policy that we must defeat and destroy Daesh,” Kerry said, using the Arabic term for Islamic State. “It is not a decision to enter into Syria’s civil war.

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