Convicted church killer wants to fire Jewish, Indian lawyers

COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — A white supremacist who was sentenced to death in the 2015 massacre of nine black worshippers ...
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The Ticker: U.S. adds Israeli to Mobileye insider trading indictment

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TechNation: Capital Markets Authority slates first-ever hackathon for pensions and insurance

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Teva sells rest of women’s health business for $1.4 billion

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Missing Man’s Decomposing Body Sat in Truck for 8 Months in Airport Parking Lot As Family Searched

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State gives buyers of discount homes more leeway to sell

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Sea level rise is accelerating, with Greenland in leading role

Sea level rise is accelerating, with Greenland in leading roleGlobal sea level rise is accelerating as the Greenland Ice Sheet sheds more of its ice, scientists have found.  Given this quickening pace, it's possible that by the end of this century, sea level rise could threaten coastal communities around the world, from Miami to Mumbai.  A new study, published Monday in the journal
Nature Climate Change, is one of a few recent works to confirm an acceleration in sea level rise during the past few decades. There had been greater uncertainty about this before, with climate deniers latching onto that and arguing that such an acceleration has not, in fact, been occurring. SEE ALSO: Trump to mayor of sinking island: Don't worry about sea level rise However, by using calculations of the various contributing factors to sea level rise, such as melting ice sheets, water expansion that occurs as the oceans warm, and other factors, researchers from institutions in China, Australia, and the U.S. found that global mean sea level increased from about 2.2 millimeters per year in 1993 to 3.3 millimeters per year in 2014.  July 30, 2013 in Qaqortoq, Greenland.Image: Joe Raedle/Getty ImagesWhile that may seem tiny, the numbers add up quickly. These rate changes are the difference between a decadal sea level rise rate of 0.86 inches and 1.29 inches, with greater acceleration expected in the future.  The findings also made clear how major contributors to sea level rise have been changing over time. And it doesn't paint a pretty picture.  Whereas global ice mass loss constituted 50 percent of sea level rise in 1993, this rose to 70 percent in 2014. The study found that the largest increase came from the Greenland Ice Sheet, which made up just 5 percent of the global mean sea level rise rate in 1993, and now constitutes 25 percent of it.  Given scientists' concerns about Antarctica's stability, look for melting glaciers to comprise an even greater share of the sea level rise budget in the near future. Sea level is accelerating! and largest change is coming from increased mass flux of Greenland ice sheet. Now contributes 25% of annual rise. — Chris Harig (@chrisharig) June 26, 2017 The sea level rise rates we expect over next 100 years are several times what the Dutch dealt with in the last 500 years of dike building. — Chris Harig (@chrisharig) June 26, 2017 A different study published in early June found the rate of sea level rise just about tripled between 1990 and 2012.  A study published in 2016 found that if global warming continues above 2 degrees Celsius, or 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit, above preindustrial levels through 2100, then sea levels would end up rising faster than at any time during human civilization. That study found that in a warming scenario of 5 degrees Celsius, or 9 degrees Fahrenheit, which is roughly the path we’re on now, New York City could see more than a meter, or about 3.6 feet, of sea level rise with an even higher upper limit. This would make a Hurricane Sandy-sized storm surge far more common in the city. A separate study published in February found that current rates of sea level rise are likely unprecedented in at least the past 2,800 years. This week's findings are in line with NASA's estimate for the current rate of sea level rise, which is 3.4 millimeters per year.  Calved icebergs from the nearby Twin Glaciers are seen floating on the water on July 30, 2013 in Qaqortoq, Greenland.Image: Joe Raedle/Getty ImagesThe significance of the new study is that it resolves lingering uncertainties about mismatches between what scientists know about contributors to sea level rise, and measured rates from satellites. This study, along with other recent work, shows the two match up closely, and it nails down the sea level rise acceleration.  Also, the new research shows that coastal communities that are already struggling with increased flooding on an annual basis, such as Miami Beach, will have to cope with a rapidly worsening situation in coming decades.  For every millimeter that the local sea level rises, the easier it becomes for the ocean to hit previously unheard of flood levels. Storm surges ride on top of background sea levels, and like a basketball player playing on a court with a steadily rising floor, even weaker storms are becoming more likely to score a slam dunk.  WATCH: It's official, 2016 was Earth's warmest year on record


Why the supreme court's travel ban ruling may not be a win for Trump

Why the supreme court's travel ban ruling may not be a win for TrumpDonald Trump proclaimed victory after the supreme court’s decision. Donald Trump was quick to proclaim victory when the supreme court decided to allow elements of one of his most controversial policies to take effect before justices hear the case in the fall. “Today’s unanimous Supreme Court decision is a clear victory for our national security,� the US president said in a statement.


Apple’s latest acquisition points to a future without the iPhone

Apple’s latest acquisition points to a future without the iPhone

An intriguing new report from MacRumors relays that Apple recently acquired SensoMotoric Instruments, a German-based company with expertise across varying types of eye-tracking technologies.

According to the company's website, its technology (both hardware and software) can not only be used for mobile eye tracking on glasses, but for VR and AR purposes as well. Word of the acquisition is particularly notable given recent rumors pointing towards Apple's interest in developing a pair of augmented reality-based smart glasses.

Just a few weeks ago, an anonymous leaker with ties to Foxconn revealed that Apple is actively working on developing a pair of smart glasses and that the company is hoping to transition the initiative "from a science project towards a consumer product.â€� Additionally, the leaker revealed that Apple's current smart glasses prototype employs a prism to project an image onto a lens with a resolution of 428×240.

A few months previous, Bloomberg issued a report indicating that Apple's rumored smart glasses might serve as a handy accessory used alongside an iPhone.

"While still in an exploration phase," the report said at the time, "the device would connect wirelessly to iPhones, show images and other information in the wearer’s field of vision, and may use augmented reality, the people said."

Now to be clear, Apple hasn't confirmed the acquisition — as it sometimes does when evidence like this emerges — but MacRumors did a good amount of digging to show that the acquisition likely went through via an Apple shell company. Recall, Apple will often acquire companies via nondescript shell companies as to shroud its future product plans in secrecy. What's more, MacRumors claims to have received an insider tip confirming the acquisition. And lastly, various portions of SensoMotoric Instruments' website have been taken down, a common occurrence when a company gets bought out by Apple.

SensoMotoric Instruments recently updated its website, removing over a dozen pages with detailed information about its products. The website also no longer has a jobs portal, news blog, schedule of events and workshops, contact information, list of distributors and resellers, or mailing list signup form.

The acquisition is backed up by an anonymous tipster, who told us that he allegedly spoke to an Apple employee today who said the deal has been completed. Additionally, one of SensoMotoric's clients informed us that they have been attempting to contact the company for several weeks without hearing back.

Incidentally, some of the company's existing technology can already be found in VR headsets like the Oculus Rift. These are the kinds of moves we will continue to see in the months and years to come as Apple begins to phase out the iPhone, which we saw the first hints of at WWDC 2017 this year.