Once a possible threat to Netanyahu, Israeli tech mogul Erel Margalit quits politics

After losing out in the race for Zionist Union party chairman to Avi Gabbay, venture capitalist-turned-MK Erel Margalit announces resignation ...
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‘It’s the first time I’ve killed, and I don’t regret it’

Har Adar security officer wounded in attack released from hospital: 'I wanted to speak to my wife because I wasn't ...
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Little known facts for Sukkot 2017

A sukkah is a temporary structure but also a shelter, the basis for Thanksgiving Day and the time to read ...
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Maxim restaurant suicide bombing anniversary today

On October 4, 2003, a Muslim murdered 21 people including 4 children, wounding 51.

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Rabbi Riskin to step down from Ohr Torah network he founded

Rabbi Riskin is to be succeeded by Rabbi Kenneth Brander, Yeshiva University administrator.

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White House officials take pictures with author who compares Democrats to Nazis

White House officials take pictures with author who compares Democrats to NazisTop White House officials have been photographed with conservative author Dinesh D’Souza and his new book which argues that the Democratic Party practises tactics and methods that were promoted by fascist leaders like Hitler and Mussolini. The staffers in question were Chief White House Strategist Steve Bannon, the former Breitbart News executive who is known for promoting nationalist, anti-globalist ideas. The other was Sebastian Gorka, a deputy assistant to the President who reportedly has ties to ultra-nationalist groups in Hungary that have been accused of anti-Semitism.


House Republicans push for contempt charges against CFPB director

House Republicans push for contempt charges against CFPB directorBy Pete Schroeder WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Republicans in the U.S. House of Representatives are pushing to hold Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Director Richard Cordray in contempt of Congress for refusing to respond sufficiently to congressional subpoenas. A report released on Friday by Republican staff of the House Financial Services Committee argued there was “ample evidence” to hold Cordray in contempt because of his alleged failure to fully comply with subpoena requests. Republicans on the panel have been fiercely critical of the CFPB’s regulatory work.


US will join climate talks despite quitting Paris accord

US will join climate talks despite quitting Paris accordThe US State Department has officially informed the United Nations it will withdraw from the Paris Climate Agreement, but has left the door open to re-engaging if the terms improved for the United States. The State Department said in a press release the United States would continue to participate in United Nations climate change meetings during the withdrawal process, which is expected to take at least three years. "The United States supports a balanced approach to climate policy that lowers emissions while promoting economic growth and ensuring energy security," the department said in the release. President Donald Trump announced his decision to withdraw from the Paris deal in June, saying the accord would have cost America trillions of dollars, killed jobs, and hindered the oil, gas, coal and manufacturing industries. Landmarks around the world light up green in protest over Donald Trump pulling out of Paris accord 00:51 But he also, at the time, said he would be open to renegotiating the deal, which was agreed by nearly 200 nations over the course of years – drawing ridicule from world and business leaders who said that would be impossible. During a visit last month to Paris to meet French President Emmanuel Macron, the two discussed the deal and Mr Trump told reporters "Something could happen with respect to the Paris accords, let's see what happens." "As the President indicated in his June 1 announcement and subsequently, he is open to re-engaging in the Paris Agreement if the United States can identify terms that are more favorable to it, its businesses, its workers, its people, and its taxpayers," the State Department said in its press release about the formal notice of withdrawal. Republican US congressional leaders have backed Mr Trump's move to exit the accord. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, for example, said it was "another significant blow to the Obama administration's assault on domestic energy production and jobs". US President Donald Trump (R) and French President Emmanuel Macron shake hands at the end of the annual Bastille Day military parade on the Champs-Elysees  Credit: Alain Jocard/AFP But numerous business leaders have called the move a blow to international efforts to combat climate change, and a missed opportunity to capture growth in the emerging clean energy industry. The United States, under former President Barack Obama, had pledged as part of the Paris accord to cut U.S. greenhouse gas emissions by as much as 28 percent from 2005 levels by 2025 to help slow global warming. The earliest date for the United States to completely withdraw from the agreement is Nov. 4, 2020, around the time of the next US presidential election.


U.S. submits formal notice of withdrawal from Paris climate pact

U.S. submits formal notice of withdrawal from Paris climate pactBy Valerie Volcovici WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. State Department has officially informed the United Nations it will withdraw from the Paris Climate Agreement in a document issued on Friday, but left the door open to re-engaging if the terms improved for the United States. The State Department said in a press release the United States would continue to participate in United Nations climate change meetings during the withdrawal process, which is expected to take at least three years. “The United States supports a balanced approach to climate policy that lowers emissions while promoting economic growth and ensuring energy security,” the department said in the release.  President Donald Trump announced his decision to withdraw from the Paris deal in June, saying the accord would have cost America trillions of dollars, killed jobs, and hindered the oil, gas, coal and manufacturing industries.