Israel passes nationality bill into a law

Knesset passes controversial law seeking to enshrine the status of the State of Israel as the nation state of the ...
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Egypt presents new Hamas-Fatah reconciliation agreement

New initiative includes removal of Gaza sanctions, reinstatement of Palestinian Authority officials, report says.

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Minister Elkin to run independently for J’lem mayor

Likud officials: Coalition chairman Amsalem acted to torpedo Elkin's standing as Likud's candidate.

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Why do we love to hate so much?

TED speakers explore the causes and consequences of hate - and how we can fight it.

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Israel passes controversial nation-state law defining country as Jewish national homeland

62 MKs vote in favor of the bill after a stormy debate and changes to problematic clauses ■ Arab lawmakers ...
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Israel approves controversial ‘Jewish nation state’ law

Prime Minister Netanyahu hails a "defining moment" as Israeli Arab MPs condemn the legislation ...
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U.S. judge says LinkedIn cannot block startup from public profile data

U.S. judge says LinkedIn cannot block startup from public profile dataBy Salvador Rodriguez SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) – A U.S. federal judge on Monday ruled that Microsoft Corp’s LinkedIn unit cannot prevent a startup from accessing public profile data, in a test of how much control a social media site can wield over information its users have deemed to be public. U.S. District Judge Edward Chen in San Francisco granted a preliminary injunction request brought by hiQ Labs, and ordered LinkedIn to remove within 24 hours any technology preventing hiQ from accessing public profiles. “To the extent LinkedIn has already put in place technology to prevent hiQ from accessing these public profiles, it is ordered to remove any such barriers,” Chen’s order reads.


An inflatable Trump rat is waiting for the president in Manhattan

An inflatable Trump rat is waiting for the president in ManhattanPresident Trump has a large, inflatable surprise waiting for him when he returns to Manhattan — a giant rat made in his likeness. SEE ALSO: Protesters, journalists capture sobering images of racists marching in Charlottesville The Trump rat, an art installation that was funded via Kickstarter, has been greeting New Yorkers at Fifth Ave. and 59th Street.  Here it is in all its glory. With the President scheduled to return to Midtown today, a giant inflatable #TrumpRat has arrived at 59th and 5th. pic.twitter.com/HQNRDNuJb7 — Scott Heins (@scottheins) August 14, 2017 Corner of 59th/5th, two and a half blocks up from Castle Trumpula pic.twitter.com/0VNeWKohq4 — Keith Olbermann (@KeithOlbermann) August 14, 2017 @realdonaldtrump #FuckDONALDTRUMP #fuckwhitesupremacyanditssupporters A post shared by Jose  Perez™ (@kalel259) on Aug 14, 2017 at 10:10am PDT The masterpiece is modeled after the blowup rodents used by labor unions to protest the hiring of non-union workers. BravinLee, the artist group responsible for the Trump rat, said the rat itself is "an enduring sign of resistance and ridicule," which has been repurposed to help lead protests against Trump's policies.  "The intent was to fabricate an inflatable Trump Rat and get it out into the world, keep it circulating, and loan it out to protests," BravinLee's website states. "We will inflate and position it in as many different locations that we are able."  COMING SOON TO A SIDEWALK NEAR YOU… Trump The Rat produced by #bravinlee #resist #donaldtrump #protest #publicart #inflatable #scabbytherat A post shared by BravinLee Programs (@bravinlee) on Aug 8, 2017 at 6:48am PDT This is not the first time a giant inflatable animal has been made in Trump's image. Just last week, a Trump chicken landed behind the White House: It appears some protesters have inflated this behind the White House. pic.twitter.com/TduZC591BK — Steve Kopack (@SteveKopack) August 9, 2017 The launch of the Trump rat coincides with the president's first visit home since his inauguration. Initially expected to arrive in New York on Sunday, Trump was delayed until Monday evening following the violence at Saturday's white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia.  “Racism is evil,” Trump said Monday, two days after the events in Charlottesville. “And those who cause violence in its name are criminals and thugs, including the K.K.K., neo-Nazis, white supremacists and other hate groups that are repugnant to everything we hold dear as Americans.” Trump faced heavy backlash for his initial statement regarding Charlottesville on Saturday, in which he condemned violence "on many sides," but failed to explicitly denounce the white supremacist organizations responsible. It was seen as a tepid criticism, to say the least.  WATCH: 'Get Out' rips the mask off a monster we know too well