Leading activist recalls visit to Qatar

Martin Oliner speaks about his visit to Qatar, UAE, says there's 'no room' to have different views on the need ...
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Italians embrace South Hevron Hills

South Hevron Hills Council head and delegation visit Italy, warmly received by senior officials in Palermo district.

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Danish petition to force vote on banning circumcision?

Danish petition appears likely to force vote on banning circumcision.

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Swedish racist ‘laser man’ faces Germany murder verdict

German prosecutors seek life sentence for Swedish-German citizen who murdered 68-year-old Holocaust survivor in 1992.

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Kushner Doesn't Want To Give Up His Security Clearance As John Kelly Cracks Down: Report

White House senior adviser Jared Kushner doesn’t want to give up the interim security clearance that gives him access to ...
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New poll: Likud 34, Yesh Atid 20

Likud opens a wide gap over the second-largest party, Yesh Atid, new poll shows. PM Netanyahu responds with quote from ...
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Two dead, over 200 injured in Taiwan quake

Two dead, over 200 injured in Taiwan quakeA 6.4-magnitude quake on the east coast of Taiwan has left two dead and more than 200 injured, the government said, after buildings crumbled and trapped people inside. A hotel and an apartment block were the worst hit by the quake in the port city of Hualien, according to the national fire agency. Five more buildings including a hospital have also been damaged with roads strewn with rubble, cracks along highways and damaged buildings tilted at angles.


Lawmaker warns U.S. Attorney General against stifling whistleblowers

Lawmaker warns U.S. Attorney General against stifling whistleblowersBy Sarah N. Lynch WASHINGTON (Reuters) – A U.S. Justice Department memo issued in January to employees about their communications with Congress may run afoul of rules designed to protect government whistleblowers from being muzzled, a Republican lawmaker said on Tuesday. In a Feb. 5 letter to Attorney General Jeff Sessions, Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Charles Grassley said he feared the Jan. 29 memo was an attempt to “prevent direct communications between federal employees and Congress.” Grassley, a whistleblower advocate, released both documents on Tuesday.