Anthony Bourdain reveals how he pictured Harvey Weinstein dying and controversial thoughts on Bill Clinton in last interview

In his final interview, published posthumously, Anthony Bourdain revealed the specific way he pictured Harvey Weinstein’s eventual death - and ...
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These 6 Stores Are Having Mega Sales To Compete With Prime Day 2018

Unless you've taken a digital detox in the last week, you probably know that
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Reporter forcibly removed from the audience ahead of Trump's press conference with Putin

Sam Husseini, who was covering the press conference for the Nation, was removed by Secret Service agents. “You’re grabbing me? ...
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Mike Pompeo rejects EU appeal for exemptions in sanctions against Iran

Mike Pompeo, the US Secretary of State, has rejected a high-level appeal from the EU for exemptions from sanctions against ...
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Prime Day: Amazon Offers DNA Testing at Bargain Basement Prices

You’re bound to see a friend or relative spitting into a test tube on Instagram in 2018. Thanks, Amazon.
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IDF strikes Gaza in response to firebomb attacks

Four fires started in Israel by incendiary balloon attacks Monday.

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Only 11 Syrian refugees have been taken in by the US this year

Only 11 Syrian refugees have been taken in by the US this yearAmerica has accepted just 11 Syrian refugees so far this year, it was revealed, hours after Donald Trump ordered air strikes on the country, risking sparking an uprising in violence. It prompted accusations of hypocrisy by the Trump administration. In 2015, under Barack Obama’s presidency, the US admitted 2,192 Syrian refugees, State Department figures show.


U.S. says air strikes cripple Syria chemical weapons program

U.S. says air strikes cripple Syria chemical weapons programBy Phil Stewart and Tom Perry WASHINGTON/BEIRUT (Reuters) – Western powers said on Saturday their missile attacks struck at the heart of Syria’s chemical weapons program, but the restrained assault appeared unlikely to halt Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s progress in the 7-year-old civil war. The United States, France and Britain launched 105 missiles overnight in retaliation for a suspected poison gas attack in Syria a week ago, targeting what the Pentagon said were three chemical weapons facilities, including a research and development center in Damascus’ Barzeh district and two installations near Homs.


Starbucks faces social media backlash over tepid apology for alleged racial profiling

Starbucks faces social media backlash over tepid apology for alleged racial profilingCell phone video captured a bewildered man at Starbucks this week asking Philadelphia police why they were arresting his two black friends.  Onlookers said there didn't appear to be a reason for the arrest. The men were simply sitting at the coffee shop, waiting for their business associate — the aforementioned bewildered man — to show up before placing their orders. SEE ALSO: The tech talent gap is real. Increased diversity is the solution. Now, Starbucks has confirmed that the incident was a mistake, and "are disappointed this led to an arrest." The three-sentence apology, however, is short on details or a even just a blunt admission of guilt. The company did not reply to Mashable's request for more details at the time of this publication.  We apologize to the two individuals and our customers for what took place at our Philadelphia store on Thursday. pic.twitter.com/suUsytXHks — Starbucks Coffee (@Starbucks) April 14, 2018 On April 12, a Twitter user posted a 45-second video of the arrest online, in which she commented: "All the other white ppl are wondering why it’s never happened to us when we do the same thing." @Starbucks The police were called because these men hadn’t ordered anything. They were waiting for a friend to show up, who did as they were taken out in handcuffs for doing nothing. All the other white ppl are wondering why it’s never happened to us when we do the same thing. pic.twitter.com/0U4Pzs55Ci — Melissa DePino (@missydepino) April 12, 2018 The "same thing," specifically, is waiting for a friend or sitting at Starbucks before ordering a drink. This is obviously common in many Starbucks scenarios, as Starbucks is one of the nation's most popular meeting places.  As the company states on its website: Details are still lacking, but it appears a Starbucks employee called the police on the two black men, for reasons not specified. In the tweeted statement, Starbucks apologized to the two customers. It's unlikely such a public apology would have occurred if Starbucks wasn't directly responsibly for the arrest. It's also unlikely that Starbucks would have been forced to publicly apologize for the event had the video of the wrongful arrest not been published to social media. It became an issue they couldn't ignore.  As of 4:30 p.m. Eastern time on April 14, the Twitter video has accumulated nearly four million views and the social media conversation around it continues. How revealing that a @Starbucks employee, who works in a place where people spend hours sitting around using the wifi and tapping away on their laptops with or without coffee, gets alarmed enough to call the cops just because black men enter the space and don’t order right away. https://t.co/pdzXYfMc09 — Joy Reid (@JoyAnnReid) April 14, 2018 You'll notice that nowhere in this "apology" was an admission of wrongdoing. Starbucks doesn't think the employees were wrong to call the cops on those men, they're just sorry the men got arrested over it. https://t.co/wcE6s20lwk — EricaJoy (@EricaJoy) April 14, 2018 This is an example of saying a lot but saying nothing. Who called the cops, why did they call the cops, why were the black men targeted for minding their business. I have been to starbucks all over the country 50% of people there not doing nothing but chilling. Need better answer https://t.co/SdfDHSxK0C — Robert Littal (@BSO) April 14, 2018 It took Starbucks two days to issue a paragraph. — Mohamed Salih (@MohamedMOSalih) April 14, 2018 WATCH: NASA needs you to send them pictures of clouds