IAF gets new ‘Adir’ aircraft

Three additional F-35I aircraft arrive at the Nevatim Airbase and will soon begin taking part in operational activity.

...
Read More

The Latest: Group: 'No magic bullet' to family reunification

MCALLEN, Texas (AP) — The Latest on the separation of immigrant children from their parents (all times local):
...
Read More

Fighting moves closer to center of Yemen's main port city, missiles fired at Riyadh

By Mohammed Ghobari ADEN (Reuters) - The Iran-aligned Houthi movement launched missiles on the Saudi capital Riyadh on Sunday, and ...
Read More

ANALYSIS: How Iran hijacked the Iraqi elections

The new Shiite-dominated pro-Iran government will most likely have negative repercussions for US-Iraqi relations.

...
Read More

So easy for U.S. Jews to dissociate themselves from Stephen Miller

What a simple and great idea. To disown and keep one’s distance from any senior Jewish official whose actions contradict ...
Read More

The Rabbanim Are Calling on Klal Yisroel

The Rabbanim Are Calling on Klal Yisroel: Help Us Save a Group of Orphans From Tragedy.

...
Read More

Mindfulness could help to stave off dementia, research suggests 

Mindfulness could help to stave off dementia, research suggests Mindfulness and meditation could stave off dementia, research suggests. Analysis of research involving 30,000 people found that those who suffered moderate to severe anxiety in mid-life were more likely to develop dementia years later. Researchers said responses to stress may speed up brain cell ageing and degenerative changes in the central nervous system, increasing vulnerability to conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease. And they said therapies such as mindfulness and meditation, which have been found to reduce anxiety, might reduce the risk of later dementia. Researchers from University College London examined studies looking at the association between mid-life anxiety, depression, and the development of dementia. The findings, published in BMJ Open, found an association between moderate to severe anxiety and future dementia, with a gap of at least 10 years in between diagnoses. Dementia | Read more The findings back up recent evidence pointing to a link between anxiety and risk of mild cognitive impairment, and lend weight to the known association between depression and dementia, they say. Researchers said more research was needed to establish whether reduced anxiety in middle age could reduce the risk of dementia. But they said approaches other than anti-anxiety drugs were worth exploring/ “Non-pharmacological therapies, including talking therapies and mindfulness-based interventions and meditation practices, that are known to reduce anxiety in midlife, could have a risk reducing effect, although this is yet to be thoroughly researched,” they said. Study author Dr Natalie Marchant, from UCL’s division of psychiatry, said: "Clinically significant anxiety in midlife was associated with an increased risk of dementia over an interval of at least 10 years. "These findings indicate that anxiety may be a risk factor for late-life dementia”. GPs should monitor patients suffering from anxiety in case of heightened risks, she suggested. Mindfulness: a cheat's guide "Given the high prevalence of anxiety seen in primary care, we suggest that general practitioners could consider anxiety alongside depression as an indicator of risk for dementia. "To improve the rate of earlier diagnosis of dementia, close monitoring of subtle cognitive decline in older adults with a history of anxiety, depression and cerebrovascular disease would be encouraged,” she said. Last year a trial suggested mindfulness – a meditative practice of paying more attention to the present moment, is more than twice as better at reducing stress than gardening The practice – which can involve deep breathing, has been growing in popularity in recent years, with the NHS recommending it as a way to reduce stress and anxiety. The eight week trial by the BBC and the University of Westminster showed it was better than gardening and yoga at helping people to relax. US scientists recently found that an eight week course of mindfulness, involving daily classes, can help lower inflammatory molecules and stress hormones by around 15 per cent.


U.S. lawmakers seek details from EPA chief on fuel economy rule changes

U.S. lawmakers seek details from EPA chief on fuel economy rule changesBy Valerie Volcovici WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Two Democratic lawmakers asked Environmental Protection Agency chief Scott Pruitt on Monday for documents related to proposed changes to vehicle fuel emission standards and California’s authority to set its own measures, and accused him of misleading Congress of the agency’s plans. U.S. Representatives Doris Matsui of California and Paul Tonko of New York sent the letter after reports on Friday that the EPA and National Highway Transportation Safety Administration had prepared a proposal that would likely freeze fuel economy standards from 2020 through 2026 and assert that a 1975 federal law pre-empts states from imposing their own emissions rules. Matsui said the reports, which came a day after Pruitt testified about ethics and travel concerns before two House committees, contradicted his response to her question about whether the EPA would revoke California’s Clean Air Act waiver that enables it to set more stringent fuel economy standards.


Iran bans use of popular Telegram messaging app

Iran bans use of popular Telegram messaging appIran’s judiciary on Monday banned the hugely popular Telegram messaging app, which the authorities have accused of allowing armed opposition groups to fuel unrest. A judge in Tehran gave “the order to interrupt Telegram”, the judiciary’s Mizan Online news agency said. Telegram, built by Russian tech guru Pavel Durov, is the most popular social network in Iran with some 40 million users — roughly half the population.


U.S. judge mulling compromise decision on AT&T-Time Warner deal

U.S. judge mulling compromise decision on AT&T-Time Warner dealThe judge who will decide if AT&T will be allowed to buy movie and TV show maker Time Warner indicated on Monday that he could be considering a decision that wasn’t a clear approval or blocking of the $85 billion deal. In his closing remarks, U.S. Justice Department lawyer Craig Conrath asked for the planned transaction to be stopped. In the absence of blocking it, Conrath urged the judge to consider a divestiture, or asset sale.