Cruz, O'Rourke trade attacks during testy 1st Texas debate

DALLAS (AP) — Republican Ted Cruz and Democrat Beto O'Rourke repeatedly traded barbs during a testy first debate Friday night, ...
Read More

Mueller Probe's Fate Hinges On Rod Rosenstein Convincing Trump He Was Just Joking

The fate of special counsel Robert Mueller's Trump-Russia investigation could
...
Read More

Sexual Assault Groups Stop Work With Senators Over Treatment Of Christine Blasey Ford

For two years, a task force of national sexual assault and domestic violence
...
Read More

Israeli soldiers accused of sexually harassing Palestinian women at checkpoint

The suspects, who were deployed at the Qalandiyah checkpoint next to Ramallah, are thought to have conducted searches of Palestinian ...
Read More

How Waze is trying to make carpooling fun

Gai Berkovich, the development director for the Google-owned company in Israel, tells Haaretz how the new carpool service wants to ...
Read More

Jerusalem’s ‘clean revolution’ is ignoring East Jerusalem

As part of a major push to change garbage collection in the city, services were privatized, sidelining municipal employees and ...
Read More

Investors hopeful Mexico's Lopez Obrador will veer to the center

Investors hopeful Mexico's Lopez Obrador will veer to the centerBy Rodrigo Campos NEW YORK (Reuters) – Mexican assets are poised to strengthen even if leftist front-runner Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador wins Sunday’s presidential election, analysts say, on expectations he will govern from the center and as the uncertainty stemming from the race fades. Lopez Obrador, a former Mexico City mayor, holds a roughly 20-point lead over his nearest rival ahead of the July 1 vote, according to the latest polls, putting him on track to become the first leftist Mexican president since the 1930s. Strategists at Miami-based Bulltick Capital, however, are among those who believe that Lopez Obrador will pursue centrist policies once in office.


Factbox: Victims of mass shooting at Maryland newsroom

Factbox: Victims of mass shooting at Maryland newsroomHiassen, 59, brother of best-selling author Carl Hiaasen, joined The Capital, the group’s flagship title, in 2010 as assistant editor after working as a reporter at the Baltimore Sun for 15 years. Before that, he was a staff reporter at the Palm Beach Post and news anchor and reporter for radio stations across the South. The Fort Lauderdale native was also a columnist for The Capital, and his pieces appeared in the paper’s Life section every Sunday.


Maryland police were unaware of hostile tweets by murder suspect

Maryland police were unaware of hostile tweets by murder suspectPolice, however, had known that the suspect, Jarrod Ramos, had posted threatening comments on his web page about the newspaper, which he had unsuccessfully sued for defamation in 2012. It is hard to keep up with them,” Altomare said. Ramos had accused one of the Capital Gazette’s newspapers, The Capital, of defamation for reporting on his guilty plea to a misdemeanor charge of harassing a female acquaintance online.