Gunmen attack Iran military parade, killing at least 24

TEHRAN, Iran (AP) — Gunmen attacked an annual Iranian military parade Saturday in the country's oil-rich southwest, killing at least ...
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Iran: Attackers who killed 12 members of Revolutionary Guard connected to Israel and U.S.

State media reports 60 wounded, 24 killed in attack on military parade in city of Ahvaz ■ Foreign Minister Javad ...
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Survivor pulled from capsized Tanzanian ferry as death toll reaches 183

Four navy divers resumed the search operation inside the sunken MV Nyerere early on Saturday after hearing sounds that suggested ...
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Iran military parade attacked by gunmen in Ahvaz

Iran blames "terrorists backed by a foreign regime" for the attack which killed soldiers and civilians ...
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Overconfident? Dem optimism surges as midterms approach

WASHINGTON (AP) — The fight for the House majority is over.
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Google CEO Sundar Pichai denies efforts to tweak search results: Axios

The Wall Street Journal citing internal emails reported on Thursday that the company's staff discussed ways to alter search functions ...
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These nuns buy stock in gun companies to fight for gun safety

These nuns buy stock in gun companies to fight for gun safetyThese nuns are fighting guns with guns. Sort of.  The Northwest Coalition for Responsible Investment, a collective of about a dozen nun associations, invests in companies so they can then use their shareholder status to sway the companies into supporting human rights issues.  SEE ALSO: Brett Kavanaugh snubs Parkland victim's father at Senate confirmation hearing Issues have ranged from climate change to indigenous rights, but in the last few years, the nuns have shifted their focus to gun control, specifically investing in gun manufacturers because they are the "only group that isn't involved in the issue."  "When we have a tragedy, everyone says something," Sister Judy Byron, director of the Northwest Coalition for Responsible Investment, told CTV News. "Even the NRA, but not the gun manufacturers." Calling gun violence "both a human rights issue and a health issue," Byron said the organization has been pushing manufacturers to file resolutions that detail two key steps: how their company will make gun products safer, and how they plan on keeping their products from "perpetuating violence."  The Sisters have shares in Sturm Ruger & Co. and American Outdoor Brands, companies that produce the kind of semi-automatic rifles used in both the Vegas and Parkland shootings. In May, their coalition successfully rallied other shareholders into pressuring Sturm Ruger to release public reports on the number of times their products have been linked to a mass shooting.  And thanks to the Sisters' influence, Dick's Sporting Goods stopped selling assault-style weapons after 17 children were killed in the Parkland shooting. The retailer also updated its gun policy, and only sells firearms to customers over 21.  The nuns are also using their clout against American Outdoor Brands. At the end of September, the gun manufacturer's shareholders will vote on a resolution to limit gun violence.  “The gun industry is saying they’re not going to change," Sister Byron told the
Seattle Times after getting Sturm Ruger to adopt the resolution. "This shows they're going to have to."  WATCH: This anti-smoking giant is taking on Juul


Tesla tumbles on new executive departures, Musk interview

Tesla tumbles on new executive departures, Musk interviewShares of Tesla Motors tumbled Friday as investors were rattled by the departures of two executives and a late-night interview in which chief executive Elon Musk was seen smoking marijuana. Tesla shares sank 6.3 to close at $263.24 after the latest events that heightened concerns over Musk’s erratic management style at the electric carmaker. “Elon’s actions are making it harder and harder to support Tesla as a company,” said analyst Gene Munster of Loup Ventures.